The OSU English Department

Ruining your favorite novel since 1873.
Recent Tweets @

Spotlight: Professor Jonathan Buehl

Read Professor Buehl’s article, “Teaching Stylistic Fluency through Science Fluency.”

Spotlight: Professor Jonathan Buehl

Professor Buehl takes a stab at our Seven Questions!

Spotlight: Professor Jonathan Buehl

This week, our spotlight falls on Professor Buehl, master in rhetoric and composition, rhetoric of science, visual rhetoric, and technical & business writing.

Professor Buehl has taught professional writing courses that use style to teach students about science and science to teach them about style. He encourages students that a focus on style provides a conceptual framework and practical resources for approaching processes and challenges related to producing scientific prose for experts, creating understandable documents for non-expert decision makers, and developing engaging popularizations.

Be sure to stop back this week for more on Professor Buehl!

Spotlight: Professor Brian McHale

Read Professor McHale’s musings the contemporary presence and significance of Alice from Alice in Wonderland. In 2011, McHale presented on the subject at a Project Narrative conference.

Read his findings here (x)

Spotlight: Professor Brian McHale

Pictured above are Professor McHale’s publications:

Postmodernist Fiction (1987)

Constructing Postmodernism (1992)

The Obligation Toward the Whole (2004)

Spotlight: Professor Brian McHale

Professor McHale tackles our “Seven Questions,” revealing his unhappy feelings toward The Happiest Place on Earth, and telling us about his work with contemporary fiction.

Spotlight: Distinguished Professor Brian McHale

Professor McHale is a Rhodes Scholar (Rhode Island 1972), D Phil from Merton College, Oxford, and BA from Brown University. He has taught at Tel Aviv University, West Virginia University, the University of Pittsburgh, the University of Freiburg (Germany), the University of Canterbury (New Zealand), and Shanghai Jiao Tong University, among other institutions. He was for many years associate editor, and later co-editor, of the journal Poetics Today.  He is co-founder of Project Narrative at Ohio State, and co-founder and past president of the Association for the Study of the Arts of the Present (A.S.A.P.).  He is the author of Postmodernist Fiction (1987), Constructing Postmodernism (1992), and The Obligation toward the Difficult Whole (2004), as well as articles on free indirect discourse, mise en abyme, narrativity, modernist and postmodernist poetics, narrative poetry and science fiction. He co-edited, with Randall Stevenson, The Edinburgh Companion to Twentieth-Century Literatures in English(2006); with David Herman and James Phelan, Teaching Narrative Theory (2010); with Luc Herman and Inger Dalsgaard, The Cambridge Companion to Thomas Pynchon(2012); and with Joe Bray and Alison Gibbon, The Routledge Companion to Experimental Literature (2012).

Learn more about Professor McHale throughout this week!

Spotlight: Professor Lee Martin

Check out Professor Martin’s publications:

His latest works, a memoir Such a Life and novel The Bright Forever (Pulitzer Prize nominated)

Short Story Collection The Least You Need to Know and memoirs From Our House and Turning Bones

And novels Quakertown, Break the Skin, and River of Heaven.

More information and links to buy books here (x)

Events: Shakespeare’s Birthday

Congratulations to our 2014 Creative Writing Awards recipients!

THE REBA ELAINE PEARL BURKHARDT ROORBACH AWARD IN CREATIVE NONFICTION—for the best essay or nonfiction book chapter by an undergraduate (Judged by: Bill Roorbach)

  • WINNER: HALEY COWANS, “Magic Mirror” 

THE JACOBSON SHORT STORY AWARD—for the best short story by an undergraduate (Judged by: Marcia Douglas)

  • WINNER: JAMES MITCHELL MCGUIRE, “Mommy and Me”
  • Honorable Mentions: Amy Noakes, “Volcano”; Chris Radebaugh, “Epi”; Ephraim Ungar, “Ohm” 

THE GERTRUDE LUCILLE ROBINSON AWARD—for the best piece of creative writing (any genre) by an undergraduate woman (Judged by: Heather Kirn Lanier)

  • WINNER: MELANIE RITZENTHALER, “A Last Will”
  • Honorable Mentions: Dori Grabinski, “Beauty Myth”; B. Diane Kollman, “How to Play the Harp”; Emily Spencer, “Exits” 

THE CITINO UNDERGRADUATE POETRY AWARD—for the best group of poems, not to exceed 10 single-spaced pages, by an OSU senior English major (Judged by: Erica Dawson)

  • WINNER: DORI GRABINSKI, “Stepmother Baking Bread” and other poems 

THE ACADEMY OF AMERICAN POETS AWARD (THE ARTHUR RENSE PRIZE) for the best poem or group of no more than three poems (open to graduate and undergraduate students) (Judged by: Corey Van Landingham)

  • WINNER: MFA student JANELLE DOLRAYNE, “The Pangboche Hand”
  • Honorable Mentions: Undergraduate student Caroline Angell, “I Become the Villainess of a 60’s Sexploitation Film”; MFA student Jenna Kilic, “The Broken Letters” 

THE HAIDEE FORSYTH BURKHARDT AWARD IN CREATIVE NONFICTION—for the best essay or nonfiction book chapter by a graduate student (Judged by: Bill Roorbach)

  • WINNER: JAMIE LYN SMITH, “The Old House” 

THE TARA M. KROGER AWARD—for the best short story by an MFA student (Judged by: Michael Kardos)

  • WINNER: REBECCA TURKEWITZ, “Four Houses Down” Honorable Mention: Kate Norris, “Collateral Damage” 

THE VANDEWATER POETRY AWARD—for the best poem or group of no more than three poems (Judged by: Ida Stewart)

  • WINNER: JANELLE DOLRAYNE, “Animals Fleeing from Paintings” and other poems
  • Honorable Mentions: Megan Peak, “After Reading My Horoscope in the New Year” and other poems; Paige Quiñones, “I Dreamed in Spanish Once” and other poems 

THE HELEN EARNHART HARLEY CREATIVE WRITING FELLOWSHIP AWARD IN FICTION—for the best body of fiction (multiple stories or an excerpt of a novel of at least 40 pages and not to exceed 70 pages) by a graduate student (Judged by: TaraShea Nesbit)

  • WINNER: TERRANCE WEDIN, Anchor
  • Honorable Mentions: Chelsie Bryant, Fatherlessland; Kristin Ferebee, “Tom, Thom” and “Zugunruhe” 

THE HELEN EARNHART HARLEY CREATIVE WRITING FELLOWSHIP AWARD IN POETRY—for the best body of poetry (of at least 20 pages and not to exceed 30 pages) by a graduate student (Judged by: Mary Biddinger)

  • WINNER: MIKKO HARVEY, “Into the Ordinary” and other poems
  • Honorable Mention: Megan Peak, “Time Lapse” and other poems 

THE HELEN EARNHART HARLEY CREATIVE WRITING FELLOWSHIP AWARD IN CREATIVE NONFICTION—for the best body of nonfiction (multiple essays or an excerpt of a book-length work of at least 40 pages and not to exceed 70 pages) by a graduate student (Judged by: Sarah Messer)

  • WINNER: NINA YUN, “Kimchee” and other essays